ClickStart: Backbone Plus RESTful App in One Click

Earlier, I wrote about the productivity boosts offered by the ClickStart application templates feature. The essence of the earlier blog is: ClickStarts are project templates (like Maven archetypes, if you know what they are) but on some serious steroids (in fact any more steroids and they could win the Tour De France (just kidding ;-)). A ClickStart template sets up the project code, sets up the corresponding repository, Jenkins job, sets up the database and deploys the application. So in one click, developers have a development-to-deployment environment ready. They can just leap in and start coding. See my earlier blog that shows the steps to create an application.

This blog uses a ClickStart template with two of the hottest technologies around (Backbone.js and JAX-RS) and drills down into the Jenkins build set up (another recent blog showed how to access the source and database). Fire up ClickStart (use the “Deploy Instantly to CloudBees” button at the end of this blog) or if using the Toolbar select the “Backbone.js with a RESTful backend” template - the template sets up the database, repository and Jenkins build for the application.

This blog uses a ClickStart template with two of the hottest technologies around (Backbone.js and JAX-RS) and drills down into the Jenkins build set up (another recent blog showed how to access the source and database). Fire up ClickStart (use the “Deploy Instantly to CloudBees” button at the end of this blog) or if using the Toolbar select the “Backbone.js with a RESTful backend” template - the template sets up the database, repository and Jenkins build for the application.

Bring up the application - here is mine. I will keep this app live for the next few months. You can clone the code or add entries and see the database (as outlined in the previous blog).

Let us now access the Jenkins build. Use the toolbar to get to the Jenkins page. You can see that a build was successfully completed. Hit Configure to see details.

The configuration for continuous deployment is set up for you. You can see that the Git repository is set up.

Jenkins is set up to trigger a build on commit to the CloudBees Forge.  It’s also easy to set up builds to trigger from GitHub by modifying the Jenkins configuration to use GitHub hooks.

Finally, the template sets up the CloudBees Deployer plugin with the right information to deploy the artifact to CloudBees on a successful build.

A good next step here is to add your tests and tie them into the build process.

My next blog in the ClickStart series will show another “hot technologies” template (Scala + Lift) and describes the json (meta-information) required to set up your own ClickStarts.

 

Regards,

Harpreet Singh
Senior Director, Product Management
CloudBees
www.cloudbees.com

 

Harpreet Singh Senior Director, Product Management CloudBees

Harpreet has 12 years of experience in the software industry. Prior to CloudBees, he was at Oracle and Sun for 10 years in various roles, including leading the marketing efforts for Java EE 6 and GlassFish 3.1. He was also product manager for Hudson, launching it within Sun’s GlassFish Portfolio.

Comments

Warnings in the server logs after using this:<br /><br />…date… com.sun.jersey.spi.inject.Errors processErrorMessages<br />WARNING: The following warnings have been detected with resource and/or provider classes:<br /> WARNING: A sub-resource method, public java.util.List example.rest.WordResource.list() throws java.lang.Exception, with URI template, "/", is treated as a resource method<br /> WARNING: A sub-resource method, public example.rest.Word example.rest.WordResource.getWord(example.rest.Word) throws java.lang.Exception, with URI template, "/", is treated as a resource method

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