Viktor Farcic's blog

Why DevOps Requires Buy-In From Everyone

In DevOps, culture is as important as the process and tools. That’s why buy-in, from everyone, including the CEO, is essential for success. Even organizations that clearly recognize the business value of adopting a DevOps approach may face a variety of potential stumbling blocks. One of the most prevalent challenges is inherent in the divergence of what developers and operations...

Driving Digital Transformation with DevOps

DevOps enables organizations to deliver software at the speed of ideas. How Efficient Can You Get with DevOps? A CloudBees assessment of more than 100 enterprises revealed that continuous delivery enables an average efficiency gain of 66 hours per developer, per year. For a 100-person team, this efficiency equates to 6,600 more hours to invest in innovation — an estimated annual...

The 3 Attributes of DevOps Organizations

What’s the secret to organizations with efficient developer teams? CloudBees looked at data from more than 100 organizations practicing continuous delivery to identify how teams achieved efficiencies by using continuous delivery. The analysis showed that although software developers want a certain degree of autonomy and creative freedom, they also value manageability, support,...

How to Build a DevOps Culture

DevOps is about more than tools. Its core tenet is a culture of collaboration and shared goals, which eliminates finger-pointing and promotes teamwork, with everyone working together in support of the same outcome—reliable software quickly delivered to production. The challenge for many organizations is how to build a DevOps culture. People, processes and tools are the DevOps...

Continuous Delivery: The Epicenter of Digital Transformation

Way back in 1913, Henry Ford transformed the manufacturing process when he installed the first moving assembly line in one of his factories. Ford’s innovation enabled him to create high-quality products faster and cheaper, offer them to consumers at a much more affordable price and gain a significant advantage over his competitors and their manual processes. Today, continuous...

The Top 8 Questions to Ask About Continuous Delivery

Can continuous delivery transform organizations into fast-moving, software-producing machines? Yes, but getting there takes agreement, communication, transparency, tools and processes. Map your journey to continuous delivery by answering these eight questions: 1. What is continuous delivery? Continuous delivery is a process that enables development teams to continuously roll out...

DevOps and Continuous Delivery: Time to Thrive in the Digital Age

As digital technology continues to disrupt and transform businesses across industries and around the world, the ability to rapidly deliver high-quality software will make the difference between survival and extinction for many companies. Ultimately, successful adoption of DevOps and the process of continuous delivery are likely to determine whether an organization thrives or fails...

The Four Quadrants of a Dynamic and Self-Sufficient System

Any system that intends to be fully automated and self-sufficient must be capable of self-healing and self-adaptation. As a minimum, it needs to be able to monitor itself and perform certain actions both on service and infrastructure levels. Two axes can represent the set of actions a system might execute. One group of actions be represented through the differences between...

Dynamic Proxies (The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit)

The decline of hardware proxies started a long time ago. They were too expensive and inflexible even before cloud computing become mainstream. These days, almost all proxies are based on software. The major difference is what we expect from them. While, until recently, we could define all redirections as static configuration files, that changed in favor of more dynamic solutions...

Service Discovery (The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit)

Service discovery is the answer to the problem of trying to configuration our services when they are deployed to clusters. In particular, the problem is caused by a high level of dynamism and elasticity. Services are not, anymore, deployed to a particular server but somewhere within a cluster. We are not specifying the destination but the requirement. Deploy anywhere as long as...